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Reblogged from nprfreshair
nprfreshair:

Today an avalanche on Mt. Everest killed 12 Nepalese Sherpas. According to The Guardian, the accident occurred while the Sherpas were fixing ropes for other climbers in an extremely dangerous ice fall area. Tourism ministry spokesman Mohan Krishna Sapkota says they were preparing the route for the climbing season that starts later this month. 
Grayson Schaffer, senior editor for Outside Magazine, wrote an article last year called Disposable Man about the extreme risk Sherpas face and what little financial protection they have—for themselves and for their families—if they are injured, maimed or killed on the job. 

Schaffer spoke to Fresh Air last summer about the dangerous work Sherpas do on Everest:

"The thing to understand about the Sherpa workforce is that there’s no other tourism industry in the world that so frequently kills and maims its workers for the benefit of paying clients. And it’s something that people haven’t yet connected the dots on. That a 1 percent mortality rate for someone choosing to climb a mountain is acceptable, but a 1 percent mortality [rate] for the people that they rely on to get their stuff up the mountain as a workplace safety statistic is outrageous. …
If you’re a Western climber, you’re climbing the mountain once and you’re done. If you’re a Sherpa, you’re doing lap after lap after lap through this roulette wheel of hazards that we know has a death rate, long term, of 1.2 percent, and that number makes climbing Everest as a Sherpa more dangerous than working on a crab boat in Alaska. It makes it more dangerous than being an infantryman in the first four years of the Iraq War. The thing that hides that number is that the season is relatively short … and [has] a relatively small workforce.”


Photograph by Cory Richards, National Geographic 

nprfreshair:

Today an avalanche on Mt. Everest killed 12 Nepalese Sherpas. According to The Guardian, the accident occurred while the Sherpas were fixing ropes for other climbers in an extremely dangerous ice fall area. Tourism ministry spokesman Mohan Krishna Sapkota says they were preparing the route for the climbing season that starts later this month. 

Grayson Schaffer, senior editor for Outside Magazine, wrote an article last year called Disposable Man about the extreme risk Sherpas face and what little financial protection they have—for themselves and for their families—if they are injured, maimed or killed on the job. 

Schaffer spoke to Fresh Air last summer about the dangerous work Sherpas do on Everest:

"The thing to understand about the Sherpa workforce is that there’s no other tourism industry in the world that so frequently kills and maims its workers for the benefit of paying clients. And it’s something that people haven’t yet connected the dots on. That a 1 percent mortality rate for someone choosing to climb a mountain is acceptable, but a 1 percent mortality [rate] for the people that they rely on to get their stuff up the mountain as a workplace safety statistic is outrageous. …

If you’re a Western climber, you’re climbing the mountain once and you’re done. If you’re a Sherpa, you’re doing lap after lap after lap through this roulette wheel of hazards that we know has a death rate, long term, of 1.2 percent, and that number makes climbing Everest as a Sherpa more dangerous than working on a crab boat in Alaska. It makes it more dangerous than being an infantryman in the first four years of the Iraq War. The thing that hides that number is that the season is relatively short … and [has] a relatively small workforce.”

Photograph by Cory Richards, National Geographic 

Reblogged from sandandglass
Reblogged from postcardstoauthors
bookoisseur:

postcardstoauthors:

Anne Fadiman is the author of Ex Libris.

Ex Libris is one of my all-time favorite books. I give it to everyone I know.

bookoisseur:

postcardstoauthors:

Anne Fadiman is the author of Ex Libris.

Ex Libris is one of my all-time favorite books. I give it to everyone I know.

Reblogged from npr

npr:

Photos courtesy of Lawrie Brown 

"Tasting With Our Eyes: Why Bright Blue Chicken Looks So Strange"

There’s something unsettling — freakish, even, about Lawrie Brown’s photos of everyday meals.

Reblogged from theonion
Reblogged from wordsthat-speak
Maybe happiness is this: not feeling like you should be elsewhere, doing something else, being someone else. Isaac Asimov (via wordsthat-speak)

(via bookoisseur)

Reblogged from fastcompany

fastcompany:

This Atlas Maps Prejudice, Not Places

Americans think the French have smelly armpits. Swedes think Germans make bad cars. Here are the narrow-minded and hilarious ways that people around the world envision the map of Europe.

More> Co.Exist

Reblogged from explore-blog

explore-blog:

So great: Rhode Island Public Radio reporter Bradley Campbell draws the storytelling structures of iconic public radio shows on napkins – it’s like Kurt Vonnegut’s shapes of stories meet David Byrne’s diagrams of the human condition.

(thanks, @alexgoldmark)

(via skunkbear)

Reblogged from particleb0red
wertheyouth:

sexy-vegan:

Whoa this is actually powerful

I

wertheyouth:

sexy-vegan:

Whoa this is actually powerful

I

(Source: particleb0red, via laughterkey)

Reblogged from nevver